A warmer, wetter pattern for much of the Heartland

For the remainder of the week, significant precipitation will be mainly confined to the Southeast and

Northwest. Rainfall could reach 2 to 4 inches in the eastern Gulf Coast region and along the southern Atlantic Coast, while similar amounts can be expected west of the Cascades. During the weekend, a developing storm will produce widespread, generally light precipitation across the Plains and upper Midwest. Precipitation could locally top an inch from the southern Plains to the Great Lakes region. Meanwhile, warmth will expand eastward, resulting in near- to above-normal temperatures nationwide by early next week.

Looking ahead, the 6- to 10-day outlook calls for near- to above-normal temperatures and precipitation across the majority of the nation. Cooler-than-normal conditions will be limited to California and parts of neighboring states, while drier-than-normal weather will be limited to the southern Atlantic region.

5-Day Precipitation Totals

NOAA’s 6- to 10- Day Outlook

NOAA’s 8- to 14- Day Outlook

A chilly pattern across the eastern-half of the Nation

For the remainder of Friday, a cold front will deliver a few rain showers from the Ohio Valley into the Northeast. During the weekend, a stronger cold front will cross the Plains and Midwest, trailed a markedly colder weather. Early next week, freezes can be expected as far south as Texas’ northern panhandle, while temperatures will fall to near 20° across the northern Corn Belt. As the cold air begins to arrive, precipitation will change to snow before ending on Sunday as far south as the central High Plains. From April 13-15, precipitation will also end as snow in portions of the Great Lakes States. Meanwhile, significant, late-season snow accumulations can be expected in parts of the northern and central Rockies. Storm-total precipitation could reach 1 to 2 inches in the Rockies and 1 to 3 inches or more across the eastern half of the U.S. In contrast, warm, dry weather will continue in California, while mostly dry, albeit cooler, conditions will persist on the southern High Plains.

Looking ahead, the 6- to 10-day outlook calls for below-normal temperatures across the eastern half of the U.S., except across southern Florida, while warmer-than-normal weather will prevail in the West. Meanwhile, near- to above-normal precipitation across the majority of the nation will contrast with drier-than-normal conditions from the Ohio Valley into the lower Great Lakes region, and from southern California to the southern High Plains.

5-Day Precipitation Totals

NOAA’s 6- to 10- Day Outlook

NOAA’s 8- to 14- Day Outlook

A brief warming trend ahead for the Heartland

Looking ahead, a storm system currently centered over the Mid-South will drift northeastward, reaching eastern Canada by mid-week. Strong thunderstorms will remain a threat for the remainder of Monday across the lower Southeast. Additional precipitation associated with the storm will locally exceed an inch from the Ohio Valley into the Atlantic Coast States. Amounts may approach 3 inches in the Southeast due to thunderstorm activity. In the storm’s wake, precipitation will be mostly light and confined to the northern U.S. Meanwhile, a sudden warming trend in the West will quickly expand eastward, encompassing most of the nation by week’s end. Mid-week temperatures could briefly reach 80° as far north as the Dakotas. In addition, temperatures will frequently approach 100° in the Desert Southwest and occasionally exceed 90° across portions of the southern High Plains.

The 6- to 10-day outlook calls for below-normal temperatures between the Rockies and Appalachians, while warmer-than-normal weather will cover the West and portions of the Atlantic Coast States. Meanwhile, near- to above-normal precipitation east of the Rockies will contrast with drier-than-normal weather in the West.

5-Day Precipitation Totals

NOAA’s 6- to 10- Day Outlook

NOAA’s 8- to 14- Day Outlook

No shortage of moisture for the eastern Plains, Corn Belt

Over the next several days, a slow-moving storm currently organizing over the Four Corners region will produce an area of locally heavy snow from central portions of the Rockies and Plains into northern-most portions of the Great Lakes and New England, while pockets of sleet and freezing rain are possible across the northern Corn Belt and interior New England. In the storm’s warm sector, locally heavy rain — and potentially severe weather — will develop from the eastern Plains and Mississippi Valley to the central Atlantic Coast. Out west, the recent influx of Pacific moisture will retreat northward, maintaining additional late-season rain and mountain snow across the Northwest and northern Rockies.

Looking ahead, the 6- to 10-day outlook calls for above-normal temperatures across the west to contrast with near- to below-normal temperatures east of the Rockies. Drier-than-normal conditions are expected across much of the western and central U.S., though areas along the U.S.-Canadian border will remain wet. Likewise, above-normal precipitation is anticipated across the eastern third of the nation.

5-Day Precipitation Totals

NOAA’s 6- to 10- Day Outlook

NOAA’s 8- to 14- Day Outlook

An active, moisture-laden part ahead for the Midwest

An active weather pattern across the central and eastern U.S. will lead to 5-day precipitation totals of 1 to 4 inches in the states bordering the Mississippi River, as well as the Ohio Valley. Locally severe thunderstorms will accompany the rain across portions of the Plains, Midwest, and South. Meanwhile, mostly dry, windy weather will continue to plague the southern High Plains, leading to an elevated risk of wildfires and the possibility of blowing dust. Elsewhere, unsettled, showery weather will linger across the West, although precipitation amounts will not be particularly heavy.

Looking ahead, the 6- to 10-day outlook calls for below-normal temperatures in the western Gulf Coast region and from the Mississippi Valley to the East Coast, while warmer-than-normal weather will prevail from the Pacific Coast to the High Plains. Meanwhile, near- to below-normal precipitation across the majority of the U.S. will contrast with wetter-than-normal conditions in New England and the lower Southeast.

5-Day Precipitation Totals

NOAA’s 6- to 10- Day Outlook

NOAA’s 8- to 14- Day Outlook

An active pattern ahead over the next 5- to 10-days.

Wet weather will linger across the South and East into the weekend, where additional rainfall could reach 1 to 3 inches in the Southeast and 2 to 4 inches in the northern Atlantic States. Locally severe thunderstorms will accompany the showers across the South on Friday and Saturday. Farther west, warm, windy weather will develop during the weekend across the south-central U.S., resulting in an enhanced risk of wildfires and the possibility of additional blowing dust. Elsewhere, an active weather pattern will continue into early April in California and the Northwest. Five-day precipitation totals could reach 1 to 3 inches in the northern Rockies, 2 to 4 inches in the Pacific Northwest, and 4 to 8 inches in northern California. By early next week, wind-driven snow can be expected across portions of the northern Plains and upper Midwest.

Looking ahead, the 6- to 10-day outlook calls for near- to below-normal temperatures across the majority of the U.S., while warmer-than-normal weather will be confined to the Pacific Coast States and the southern Atlantic region. Meanwhile, below-normal precipitation in southern California and the Southwest will contrast with wetter-than-normal conditions in the Northwest and across the eastern half of the U.S.

5-Day Precipitation Totals

NOAA’s 6- to 10- Day Outlook

NOAA’s 8- to 14- Day Outlook

An active pattern across the northern-half of the nation

For the remainder of Monday, a developing storm will produce light snow in parts of the Midwest. Meanwhile, rain will become heavier along the Gulf Coast. Over Tuesday and Wednesday, the storm system will intensify over the western Atlantic Ocean, grazing the northern Atlantic Coast with high winds and heavy snow. Inland sections of the Northeast should escape with generally light snowfall. Meanwhile, stormy weather will begin to overspread the western U.S. Five-day precipitation totals could reach 3 to 6 inches in the Pacific Northwest, with 1 to 3 inches possible in northern California. Parts of the Rockies and Intermountain West can expect as much as 1 to 2 inches. Toward week’s end, snow will develop across portions of the northern and central Plains and spread into the Great Lakes region.

Looking ahead, the 6- to 10-day outlook calls for near- to below-normal temperatures across most of the eastern half of U.S., while warmer-than-normal weather will prevail from the Pacific Coast to the central and southern Plains. Meanwhile, near- to below-normal precipitation across the southern U.S. will contrast with wetter-than-normal conditions across the northern half of the U.S., including parts of California.

5-Day Precipitation Totals

NOAA’s 6- to 10- Day Outlook

NOAA’s 8- to 14- Day Outlook

 

More winter-like weather ahead

A rather tranquil weather pattern will become more active during the weekend, with rain developing across the South and cold weather returning to nearly all areas east of the Rockies. Early next week, much uncertainty remains regarding the development of an East Coast storm. Regardless of its coastal evolution, the nascent storm will produce some snow early next week from the northern Plains into the Midwest. Beyond that, a significant snow storm remains a possibility on March 25-26 in the Mid-Atlantic and Northeastern States, particularly along the Atlantic Seaboard. Farther west, dry weather will persist at least into the middle of next week from southern California to the southern High Plains. In addition, California will experience unusually warm weather.

Looking ahead, the 6- to 10-day outlook calls for below-normal temperatures across the eastern half of the U.S., while warmer-than-normal weather will prevail from California to the central and southern High Plains. Meanwhile, near- to above-normal precipitation across most of the country will contrast with drier-than-normal conditions from the central and southern Plains into the Southwest.

5-Day Precipitation Totals

NOAA’s 6- to 10- Day Outlook

NOAA’s 8- to 14- Day Outlook

A late-season storm ahead for the upper Midwest

Freezing rain will end later Tuesday morning in the southern Mid-Atlantic region, while rain showers will gradually diminish across Florida. Meanwhile, a late-season winter storm will track from the central Plains into eastern Canada. Along and north of the storm’s path, primarily from Wyoming to northern New England, significant snow will fall. Meanwhile, a few rain showers will occur along the storm’s trailing cold front as far south as the Ohio Valley and the Mid-Atlantic States. Elsewhere, a few showers will affect the Northwest, while dry weather will persist from California to the southern Plains.

Looking ahead, the 6- to 10-day outlook calls for below-normal temperatures from the Plains to the East Coast, while warmer-than-normal weather will prevail in the West. Meanwhile, near- to above-normal precipitation across the majority of the U.S. will contrast with drier-than-normal conditions from southern California to the southern High Plains.

5-Day Precipitation Totals

NOAA’s 6- to 10- Day Outlook

NOAA’s 8- to 14- Day Outlook

An more active pattern to resume

A period of relatively tranquil weather will end during the weekend with the development of a late-winter storm over the nation’s mid-section. Early next week, the storm will affect the nation’s southeastern quadrant. Frozen precipitation (snow, sleet, and freezing rain) can be expected along the northern fringe of the precipitation shield, with significant snowfall accumulations possible on March 16-17 in the northern Mid-Atlantic States. Meanwhile, storm-total rainfall could reach 1 to 2 inches from the Mid-South into the Southeast, with some 2- to 4- inch totals possible in the southern Atlantic region. Another surge of very cold air will trail the storm into the Midwest and Northeast, while a period of record-setting warmth in the West will end early next week. Elsewhere, dry conditions will persist into next week across California, the Great Basin, and the Desert Southwest.

Looking ahead, the 6- to 10-day outlook calls for near- to above-normal temperatures across much of the southern half of the U.S., while colder-than-normal conditions will cover the northern half of the U.S. Meanwhile, below-normal precipitation across the nation’s southern tier will contrast with wetter-than-normal weather from the northern Plains into the Midwest.

5-Day Precipitation Totals

NOAA’s 6- to 10- Day Outlook

NOAA’s 8- to 14- Day Outlook