More sub-average temperatures for the Heartland

Locally heavy showers will continue to spread across the South. Five-day rainfall totals could reach 2 to 4 inches in the southern Atlantic States. Meanwhile, locally heavy showers will continue in the Four Corners States, with flash flooding possible. In contrast, hot, mostly dry weather will dominate the Pacific Coast States. Elsewhere, a few showers will dot the northern Plains and the Midwest, but dry weather will cover the remainder of the nation’s mid-section.

Looking ahead, the 6- to 10-day outlook calls for below-normal temperatures in large sections of the central and eastern U.S., as well as the central Rockies, while hotter-than-normal conditions will cover the lower Southeast, the lower Rio Grande Valley, and the Far West. Meanwhile, near- to above-normal rainfall across the majority of the U.S. will contrast with drier-than-normal conditions in the Pacific Northwest, northern Plains, far upper Midwest, and southern parts of Arizona, Texas, and Florida.

5-Day Precipitation Totals

NOAA’s 6- to 10- Day Outlook

NOAA’s 8- to 14- Day Outlook

More cool weather ahead for the Heartland

Locally heavy showers will shift eastward from the central and southern Plains, reaching the southern Atlantic States during the weekend. Meanwhile, somewhat drier weather will prevail in the Southwest, although showers will linger across the central and southern Rockies. Most of the remainder of the West will remain mostly dry, except for scattered showers across the Great Basin and Intermountain region. Mostly dry weather will also continue through week’s end from the northern Plains into the middle Mississippi Valley. Elsewhere, an ongoing heat wave in the Northwest will contrast with near- to below-normal temperatures in most other parts of the country.

Looking ahead, the 6- to 10-day outlook calls for below-normal temperatures in much of the central and eastern U.S., while hotter-than-normal conditions will cover southern Florida and the Far West. Meanwhile, near- to above-normal rainfall across the majority of the U.S. will contrast with drier-than normal conditions in parts of southern Texas and from the Pacific Northwest into the upper Midwest.

5-Day Precipitation Totals

NOAA’s 6- to 10- Day Outlook

NOAA’s 8- to 14- Day Outlook

An unusually cool pattern across the Heartland

A robust monsoon surge interacting with the tail of a cold front will result in a continuation of locally heavy showers from the Southwest and Intermountain West to the southern Plains. During the next 5 days, additional rainfall could reach 3 to 5 inches or more in the Rockies of Colorado and northeastern Mexico. Meanwhile, rainfall totals should range from 1 to 3 inches on the southern Plains and 1 to 2 inches across the Intermountain West. In contrast, hot, mostly dry weather will cover the Northwest. Farther east, several days of cooler-than-normal weather will dominate the central and eastern U.S. Heavy rain will end later Monday in the Northeast, but scattered showers will linger for several days in the Great Lakes region and across the Deep South.

Looking ahead, the 6- to 10-day outlook calls for above-normal temperatures in the Far West and across the nation’s northern tier, while cooler-than-normal conditions will prevail from the central and southern Rockies to the middle and southern Atlantic States. Meanwhile, near- to above-normal rainfall across the majority of the nation will contrast with drier-than-normal weather in portions of the central U.S., stretching from Louisiana northward into the upper Midwest.

5-Day Precipitation Totals

NOAA’s 6- to 10- Day Outlook

NOAA’s 8- to 14- Day Outlook

An unseasonably cool pattern ahead for the Heartland

A slow-moving cold front will trigger showers and thunderstorms as it tracks across the northern and central Plains into the Corn Belt, reaching the Atlantic Coast States by Monday. Rain will be heaviest in the Great Lakes region, where totals could top 2 inches in potentially severe thunderstorms. Ahead of the front, sweltering heat will briefly expand from the southern Plains into the Southeast, with highs approaching or topping 100° before the front’s arrival. Behind the cold front, sharply cooler weather will settle over most of the nation east of the Rockies by Tuesday. Meanwhile, the tail end of the front will stall across the central Rockies and southern Plains, where locally heavy downpours are possible by early next week.

Looking ahead, the 6- to 10-day outlook calls for much-below-normal temperatures from the central Rockies to the East Coast, while hotter-than-normal conditions prevail west of the Rockies. Drier-than-normal conditions are expected from the northern Pains into the Corn Belt, while above-normal rainfall develops from the Great Basin to the southern Plains and Delta.

5-Day Precipitation Totals

NOAA’s 6- to 10- Day Outlook

NOAA’s 8- to 14- Day Outlook

A very cool pattern ahead for most of the Heartland

Cool weather in the Midwest will be reinforced early next week by a strong push of Canadian air. Heat across the High Plains will be relegated to the South, while a brief cool spell in the Northwest will be replaced by a weekend return to hot weather. During the next 5 days, 1- to 2-inch rainfall totals can be expected in parts of the northern Plains, Midwest, and Northeast, as well as the Pacific Northwest and Four Corners.

Looking ahead, the 6- to 10-day outlook calls for below-normal temperatures east of the Rockies, except for hotter-than-normal conditions in the Deep South. Heat will also dominate the West. Meanwhile, below-normal rainfall in southern Texas and from the Pacific Northwest into the upper Midwest will contrast with wetter-than-normal weather across the southern Plains, Four Corners States, and from the lower Great Lakes region to the Atlantic Seaboard.

5-Day Precipitation Totals

NOAA’s 6- to 10- Day Outlook

NOAA’s 8- to 14- Day Outlook

Much cooler pattern ahead east of the Rockies

During the remainder of the week, a pair of cold fronts will push southeastward across the Midwest and into the South and East. As a result, 5-day rainfall totals could reach 1 to 2 inches, with locally higher amounts, across the nation’s northern tier and from the Mississippi Valley to the East Coast. Meanwhile, a few showers will return to the Southwest, but California will remain seasonably dry. Rapid temperature fluctuations can be expected with the cold frontal passages, but late-week heat will be most prominent across the High Plains.

Looking ahead, the 6- to 10-day outlook calls for below-normal temperatures east of the Rockies, except for warmer-than-normal weather in the Deep South. Hot weather will also dominate the West. Meanwhile, below-normal rainfall across the northern Plains, Northwest, and southern Texas will contrast with wetter-than-normal conditions across much of the southern Plains and the eastern one-third of the U.S.

5-Day Precipitation Totals

NOAA’s 6- to 10- Day Outlook

NOAA’s 8- to 14- Day Outlook

Unseasonably cool weather set to return

A cold front will bring a return to showery weather across the nation’s heartland, starting with thunderstorms in the far upper Midwest on Monday. Tuesday and Wednesday, showers will sweep across the remainder of the Midwest, while a new cold front will arrive in the Northwest. The front’s passage will lower temperatures that have recently climbed to above-normal levels in the Midwest and have briefly topped 100° on the Plains as far north as South Dakota. Toward week’s end, a new round of showers will overspread the northern Plains and upper Midwest, while the original cold front will settle across the South and East. Five-day rainfall totals could reach 1 to 2 inches, with locally higher amounts, in a broad area covering the North, Southeast, and Midwest. Elsewhere, generally dry weather will prevail from California to the central and southern High Plains, except for scattered Monsoon showers in the central and southern Rockies.

Looking ahead, the 6- to 10-day outlook calls for below-normal temperatures across the Midwest and Northeast, while warmer-than-normal weather will cover the southern Plains, southern Florida, and the West. Meanwhile, near- to below-normal rainfall from the Pacific Coast to the Plains will contrast with wetter-than-normal conditions across most of the eastern half of the U.S.

5-Day Precipitation Totals

NOAA’s 6- to 10- Day Outlook

NOAA’s 8- to 14- Day Outlook

Warm; wet across the eastern Corn Belt

A disturbance currently over the Delta will drift eastward, reaching the Appalachians by early next week. Rainfall associated with the disturbance will be heaviest in the South, with 1 to 3 inches likely across the Gulf Coast and Southeast, while lighter showers fall farther north from the Tennessee Valley into eastern portions of the Ohio Valley and Great Lakes. Elsewhere, only light showers — totaling less than an inch — can be expected across the remainder of the country during the next 5 days, except possibly for some heavier rain late in the period across the north-central U.S. Cooler-than-normal conditions will persist through the weekend across the eastern half of the U.S., while hot weather returns to the Plains. Elsewhere, the Northwestern heat wave will end during the weekend as cooler air overspreads the Pacific Coast States and Great Basin.

Looking ahead, the 6- to 10-day outlook calls for near- to above-normal temperatures nationwide, except for cooler-than-normal conditions in the Pacific Northwest. Meanwhile, below-normal rainfall across southern Texas and from the Great Basin eastward to the central Plains will contrast with wetter-than-normal weather across much of the eastern half of the U.S.

5-Day Precipitation Totals

NOAA’s 6- to 10- Day Outlook

NOAA’s 8- to 14- Day Outlook

Seasonally warm, moisture pattern for the Heartland

During the next couple of days, Southwestern moisture will spill across the southern Plains and interact with a cold front. As a result, storm-total rainfall could reach 2 to 5 inches from the southern Plains into the lower Mississippi Valley. Later, heavy showers will spread across the remainder of the Southeast. Farther east, locally heavy showers and thunderstorms will end by mid-week along the Atlantic Seaboard, where additional rainfall could total 1 to 3 inches. Elsewhere, hot, dry weather will persist in the Northwest, while cool, mostly dry weather will cover the Midwest.

Looking ahead, the 6- to 10-day outlook calls for near- to above-normal temperatures nationwide, except for cooler-than-normal conditions across parts of the interior Southeast. Meanwhile, below-normal rainfall in most areas from the Pacific Coast to the Plains will contrast with generally wetter-than-normal along and east of the Mississippi River.

5-Day Precipitation Totals

NOAA’s 6- to 10- Day Outlook

NOAA’s 8- to 14- Day Outlook

A big cool-off for the Heartland

A somewhat cooler weather pattern across the eastern half of the U.S. will be replaced by a weekend return to heat in the South. Later, a strong surge of cool air will arrive across the Plains and Midwest early next week. Showers will linger through week’s end in the southern Atlantic region, where additional rainfall could locally reach 2 to 4 inches. Farther west, showers and locally severe thunderstorms will return to the Midwest in conjunction with the push of cool air, with rainfall expected to range from 1 to 3 inches in numerous locations. Elsewhere, little or no rain will fall during the next 5 days across the southern Plains and the Pacific Coast States, with record-setting heat expected in the latter region.

Looking ahead, the 6- to 10-day outlook calls for below-normal temperatures from the northern and central Plains eastward to the northern and mid-Atlantic States, while warmer-than-normal weather will prevail across the West and Deep South. Meanwhile, below-normal rainfall in the western Gulf Coast region and from the Pacific Northwest to the Great Lakes region will contrast with wetter-than-normal conditions in the Great Basin and from the Four Corners States eastward to the southern Atlantic region.

5-Day Precipitation Totals

NOAA’s 6- to 10- Day Outlook

NOAA’s 8- to 14- Day Outlook