CDC report on antibiotics mentions food animal use

A new report on antibiotic resistance by the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) includes a cautionary section about antibiotic use in food producing animals.  It says “resistant bacteria can be transmitted from food-producing animals to humans through the food supply.”

However, the report shows that “most deaths related to antibiotic resistance happen in healthcare settings such as hospitals and nursing homes.”

It says “resistant bacteria can be transmitted from food-producing animals to humans through the food supply.” Further, the report says antibiotics should only be used under veterinary oversight in food producing animals and “only to manage and treat infectious diseases, not to promote growth.”

A food animal science expert, Dr. Scott Hurd with Iowa State University, has told Brownfield that that transmission to humans can only occur in “very, very rare cases.”

The CDC report says antibiotics must be used judiciously in humans and animals.

The government report says at least 23-thousand people die from antibiotic resistant infections in the U.S. each year that affect more than two-million people.

 


© Copyright 2013 Brownfield, All rights Reserved. Written For: Brownfield

Comments

  1. Marcy says:

    And what percentage of those antibiotic resistant infections originate in HOSPITALS? The majority of them! As Dr. Hurd said, very few are food-related, so why play into the anti-animal-use sociopaths and jump all over animal enterprises that are doing scientifically-based and humane practices with their animals? Because it is right now “socially” and “politically” correct? What a crock of crap to throw on the American public.

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